Storyteller's October Showcase: "How Do We Become . . . Us?"


Jeanne Anderson enjoys recalibrating familiar material to fit a different demographic. She usually regales schoolchildren with stories drawn from her own childhood as well as fairy tales and Shakespearean plays designed to explore everyday issues and encouraging the to see the world
from varying perspectives.

Rick Huddle has performed for audiences young and old in schools and at story festivals across the United States as well as in Mexico, Thailand and Colombia. Rick says that stories, songs, and laughter can help us better understand ourselves and each another – especially those with whom we don’t often agree. He and his wife Kristin are raising twins Gus & Marlo in Portland.

Kriya Kaping comes from a family of storytellers whose motto might as well be “If it doesn’t kill you, it makes for a great story!” When she is it on stage Kriya gathers material in a career specializing in media production, creative writing and public speaking.

International circus performer and character actor Thomas Schroyer has performed in such diverse venues as New York City burlesque houses, Brazilian street festivals, circus tents, and dinner theaters. His characters include Chaplinesque mime Tommy Twimble and Pappy, an old-school magician who imparts homespun wisdom in stories and toasts.

10/05/2019 7:30 PM

Door Time: 7:00 PM

Other Showtimes

What influences who we are? Hearing our weird uncles debating the benefits of being a musician or a magician? Getting that poodle-head perm in second grade?

Storytellers Jeanne Anderson, Will Hornyak, Rick Huddle and Kriya Kaping explore real and imagined experiences — bending a spoon, contending with a sixth-grade bully, becoming the first woman of color to rocket into space — in an evening of stories “How Do We Become …
Us?” — Saturday, October 5 at the Clinton Street Theater.

Tickets are $15 on line ($12 for Portland Storytellers Guild members and their guests) or $20 the evening of the show when doors open at 7 and the stories begin at 7:30.


Jeanne Anderson enjoys recalibrating familiar material to fit a different demographic. She usually regales schoolchildren with stories drawn from her own childhood as well as fairy tales and Shakespearean plays designed to explore everyday issues and encouraging the to see the world
from varying perspectives.

Rick Huddle has performed for audiences young and old in schools and at story festivals across the United States as well as in Mexico, Thailand and Colombia. Rick says that stories, songs, and laughter can help us better understand ourselves and each another – especially those with whom we don’t often agree. He and his wife Kristin are raising twins Gus & Marlo in Portland.

Kriya Kaping comes from a family of storytellers whose motto might as well be “If it doesn’t kill you, it makes for a great story!” When she is it on stage Kriya gathers material in a career specializing in media production, creative writing and public speaking.

International circus performer and character actor Thomas Schroyer has performed in such diverse venues as New York City burlesque houses, Brazilian street festivals, circus tents, and dinner theaters. His characters include Chaplinesque mime Tommy Twimble and Pappy, an old-school magician who imparts homespun wisdom in stories and toasts.