PDX German Film Festival Monthly Film Series presents THE ENDLESS NIGHT

Berlin Tempelhof Airport in the early sixties. A thick fog lies over the city and several flights have been cancelled. Travellers are stuck in the waiting hall overnight, at the mercy of themselves and their fellow travellers. Burnt-out starlet Sylvia (Hannelore Elsner) tries to find a bed for the night, while a Polish jazz combo (score written by Peter Thomas) has a jam session to banish the fog. Farmer John McLeod (Bruce Low) is not sad about having to spend the night at the airport, as he has fallen in love with the check-in desk lady Juanita (Alexandra Stewart). Ageing actor Stoltmann (Fritz Rémond) fears he won’t be able to play King Lear in Hanover – the leading role he’s been waiting for all his life. Businessmen are damned to inactivity, and dramatic relationship crises erupt. The camera loses track of people, only to find them again elsewhere. Viewers are left to guess what has happened in the meantime. The result: observations of everyday life, portrayed with a finesse and subtlety that hasn’t been seen for a long time.


07/09/2020 7:00 PM

Door Time: 6:30 PM

Other Showtimes

Berlin Tempelhof Airport: Several flights have been cancelled, and people wait in the fog for planes that don’t arrive. Individual fates come to light behind the usual everyday stories. There’s deception and adultery, lost illusions and ruined careers. Within just a few hours, people are thrown off the seemingly ordered paths of their lives. When the next day arrives, their lives have changed forever.

Without a predetermined script and using improvised lines, the visionary Will Tremper made a film in 1962/63 that fascinates with its authenticity and the presence of great German actors such as Werner Peters, Harald Leipnitz and Hannelore Elsner, as well as cameos by Mario Adorf and Wolfgang Neuss. The film still has enthusiastic fans among film buffs.

Die endlose Nacht is a thriller, melodrama and comedy in one – timeless and more contemporary now than ever before – and one of the most important films of the New German Cinema of the 1960s.

Berlin Tempelhof Airport in the early sixties. A thick fog lies over the city and several flights have been cancelled. Travellers are stuck in the waiting hall overnight, at the mercy of themselves and their fellow travellers. Burnt-out starlet Sylvia (Hannelore Elsner) tries to find a bed for the night, while a Polish jazz combo (score written by Peter Thomas) has a jam session to banish the fog. Farmer John McLeod (Bruce Low) is not sad about having to spend the night at the airport, as he has fallen in love with the check-in desk lady Juanita (Alexandra Stewart). Ageing actor Stoltmann (Fritz Rémond) fears he won’t be able to play King Lear in Hanover – the leading role he’s been waiting for all his life. Businessmen are damned to inactivity, and dramatic relationship crises erupt. The camera loses track of people, only to find them again elsewhere. Viewers are left to guess what has happened in the meantime. The result: observations of everyday life, portrayed with a finesse and subtlety that hasn’t been seen for a long time.