Portland Storytellers present "The Season of Expectations — Met? Or Not?"

While Barbara Fankhauser loves tales from all traditions, it is the great Celtic and Norse epics of her own ethnicity--and the rich trove of mid-life and elder tales—that take her heart these days, stories that carry the wisdom we all need to navigate our years with wit, grace and insight.

Stories are in Hawaiian-born Rob Luck’s blood. Rob’s father, Lucky Luck, regaled radio and television audiences in Honolulu with stories and his mother, Ruth, a Samoan dancer at the Royal Hawaiian Hotel on Waikiki, descended from a long line of “talking chiefs.” Thus Rob says he embraces the art of storytelling as “a gift we all must share.”

Patrick Gannon loved reading stories to the generations of third-graders he taught. In retirement he has moved from the printed page to the art of oral storytelling. Though he still enjoys children’s stories as well as personal narratives, he prefers enlightening audiences with historical stories about individuals whose achievements ought to be better known and appreciated than they are.


Jacki Wildenauer, who moved west from Minnesota to California in 1990 and found her way up the coast to Oregon five years later, was long a source of stories for family and friends, But she never told them publicly until “a force stronger than shyness” drew her on stage one evening in 2014 and led to what she calls “a new adventure” she is happy to share with Guild audiences.

12/01/2018 7:30 PM

Door Time: 7:00 PM

Other Showtimes

How better to ward off the darkening days of ahead than with an evening of tales that discover new sources of light?

Barbara Fankhauser, Patrick Gannon, Rob Luck and Jacki Wildenauer will find cause for gratitude and celebration in the most unlikely places in the Portland Storytellers Guild’s final monthly show of 2018.

While Barbara Fankhauser loves tales from all traditions, it is the great Celtic and Norse epics of her own ethnicity--and the rich trove of mid-life and elder tales—that take her heart these days, stories that carry the wisdom we all need to navigate our years with wit, grace and insight.

Stories are in Hawaiian-born Rob Luck’s blood. Rob’s father, Lucky Luck, regaled radio and television audiences in Honolulu with stories and his mother, Ruth, a Samoan dancer at the Royal Hawaiian Hotel on Waikiki, descended from a long line of “talking chiefs.” Thus Rob says he embraces the art of storytelling as “a gift we all must share.”

Patrick Gannon loved reading stories to the generations of third-graders he taught. In retirement he has moved from the printed page to the art of oral storytelling. Though he still enjoys children’s stories as well as personal narratives, he prefers enlightening audiences with historical stories about individuals whose achievements ought to be better known and appreciated than they are.


Jacki Wildenauer, who moved west from Minnesota to California in 1990 and found her way up the coast to Oregon five years later, was long a source of stories for family and friends, But she never told them publicly until “a force stronger than shyness” drew her on stage one evening in 2014 and led to what she calls “a new adventure” she is happy to share with Guild audiences.